Feeding People


Beyond the real deal is the unreal deal, and therein lies Feeding People, a band of teenagers making some of the heaviest psychedelic around decades after the 13th Floor Elevators declared their hallucinatory sense of purpose. Feeding People founders Jessie Jones and Nic Rachman met at an Evangelical Church in Anaheim when they were just thirteen years old: the first songs they ever played together were in praise of Jesus in the Sunday School band. Six years later, they were plucked from the Orange County coffee house scene by Burger Records, home to the OC’s most talented young punks. Now, with drummer Mike Reinhart—whom Rachman met chasing wild chickens all over Yorba Linda—bassist Louis Filliger and organist Jane Reich, they play heavy and dark psychedelia with Sabbath ideals and traces of sludge metal and pre-war blues and those Sunday School sing-a-longs from years past. Nineteen-year-old Jones channels the raw power of Jefferson Airplane’s Grace Slick and Janis Joplin at her most primal as she leads with strong, almost vicious vocals, bellowing blasphemies as if possessed by spirits with a masked sweetness reminiscent of Billie Holiday. Her siren call reeled in Chris Alfaro of Free the Robots who produced some of the band’s earliest recordings, all of which were written acoustic and recorded electric in a single sweaty take in Reinhart’s parents’ 6’x10’ walk-in closet with a 4-track recorder and mic stands made of broom handles taped to fire extinguishers. After playing only a couple shows, Feeding People became the second band ever invited to play storied electronic music club Low End Theory, where they shared the stage with Radiohead’s Thom Yorke. Feeding People join the Elevators’ quest for sanity as they bridge the gap between Burger beer busts and Low End bass explosions with their debut LP, out this summer.